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  • Magnus Granberg and Ordinary Affects
    8:00 PM
    04/04/2019

    3637 Chestnut St, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104

    3637 Chestnut St, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104

    Bowerbird is pleased to present the Philadelphia premiere of the Boston-based experimental music ensemble Ordinary Affects and a new evening length work by Magnus Granberg, a Swedish composer closely associated with the Wandelweiser movement. Of Granberg’s recent How Vain Are All Our Frail Delights?, journalist Ben Harper notes, “[Granberg] combines individual sounds and small fragments of material into a type of mobile structure, allowing the musicians to draw from one group or another at different times. A resemblance to late Feldman comes here from the sense of hearing patterns overlap and repeat, only never quite the same. The music feels like one extended moment, constantly changing in appearance but never changing in substance.”
    Bowerbird’s Steinway Model O piano was donated in honor of Virginia Francis Lease.  This concert has been supported by the Swedish Arts Grants Committee.
    ABOUT THE ARTISTS
    Ordinary Affects is a Boston-based experimental music ensemble. Experimental composer/performers J.P.A. Falzone, Laura Cetilia, Luke Martin, and Morgan Evans-Weiler make-up the ensemble, performing on piano/organ/percussion, cello, violin, and guitar/electronics (respectively). The ensemble was formed as a group of musicians seeking to workshop, commission, and perform experimental music. Their work is often aligned with the tradition of John Cage and the Wandelweiser Collective. While the group frequently focuses on the performance of commissioned compositions of living composers, it also serves as a laboratory for improvisation and the compositions of its members. Whenever possible, Ordinary Affects involves the commissioned composer as a performer in the ensemble. Ordinary Affects has commissioned and premiered pieces by Eva-Maria Houben, Christian Wolff, Michael Pisaro, Antoine Beuger, Sarah Hughes, Eva-Maria Houben, Ryoko Akama, Doug Farrand, Patrick Farmer, and Jurg Frey, in addition to performing works by Joseph Kurdika, John Lely, and all ensemble members. In summer 2017, Ordinary Affects attended the Avaloch Residency. Ordinary Affects has recordings on elsewhere, Another Timbre, and forthcoming recordings on Ftarri and Editions Wandelweiser.
    Magnus Granberg is a composer and performer working at an intersection between contemporary chamber music and improvisation. He is based in Stockholm, Sweden. Born in Umeå in 1974, he studied saxophone and improvisation at the University of Gothenburg and in New York in his late teens and early twenties. Self taught as a composer, he formed his own ensemble Skogen in 2005 trying to integrate experiences, methods and materials from various traditions of improvised and composed musics into a new modus operandi. Now mainly working with the ensemble Skogen and the newly formed Skuggorna och ljuset, while increasingly also writing music on commission for different ensembles and projects. He is also active as an improvisor in different contexts, mainly playing the clarinet. His music has been performed in Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, the United States, England, Austria, Hungary and Slovenia, broadcast by public radio channels in England (BBC Radio 3 and 6), Germany (SWR 2), Sweden (SR P2), Estonia, Slovenia, Serbia, Hungary and the United States, and has been published by the renowned British record label Another Timbre. Recent work includes a commission from Another Timbre and Ensemble Grizzana and collaborations with musicians such as David Sylvian, Christoph Schiller and the Swiss duo Diatribes. He has in the last decade also, more or less regularly, collaborated with musicians such as Angharad Davies, Tisha Mukarji, Tetuzi Akiyama, Toshimaru Nakamura, Anna Lindal, Kristine Scholz, Rhodri Davies, Simon Allen, Christoph Schiller and Ko Ishikawa.
  • Maria Grand & Jupiter Blue
    8:00 PM
    04/04/2019

    1638 East Berks Street, Philadelphia, PA 19125

    1638 East Berks Street, Philadelphia, PA 19125

    Maria Grand (solo):
    María Grand is a saxophonist, composer, educator, and vocalist. She moved to New York City in 2011. She has since become an important member of the city’s creative music scene, performing extensively in projects including musicians such as Nicole Mitchell, Vijay Iyer, Craig Taborn, Mary Halvorson, Jen Shyu, Fay Victor, Joel Ross, Steve Lehman, Aaron Parks, Miles Okazaki, etc. María writes and performs her original compositions with her ensemble, DiaTribe; her debut EP “TetraWind” was picked as “one of 2017’s best debuts” by the NYC Jazz Record and her full-length album Magdalena was praised by major publications such as the New York Times, Downbeat, JazzTimes, Billboard, JazzIz, and others. The New York Times calls her “an engrossing young tenor saxophonist with a zesty attack and a solid tonal range”, while Vijay Iyer says she is “a fantastic young saxophonist,
    virtuosic, conceptually daring, with a lush tone, a powerful vision, and a deepening emotional resonance.”
    María is a recipient of the 2017 Jazz Gallery Residency Commission, the 2018 Roulette Jerome Foundation Commission, and the 2019 Roulette Residency. She was nominated for the Jazz Journalist’s Association Up-And-Coming Musician of the Year 2018 and named the 2018 Newcomer Musician for the El Intruso 11th Annual International Critics Poll. As an activist in the performing arts, María is a founding member of anti-discrimination group the We Have Voice Collective. María is a member of Joel Ross’ Parables, has toured with Antoine Roney, and performs regularly with her own ensemble, as well as with RAJAS, led by Carnatic musician Rajna Swaminathan, and will tour in 2019 with Code Girl, led by Mary Halvorson. She has toured Europe, the United States, and South America, playing in venues and festivals such as WinterJazzFest and the Village Vanguard in NYC, La Villette Jazz Festival in Paris, Saafelden Jazz Festival in Austria, Millennium Park in Chicago, the Blue Whale in LA, IloJazz in Guadeloupe (FR), and many others.
    Jupiter Blue:
    From the Arkestra’s engine room, Jupiter Blue’s tone scientists D.Hotep and Jupiter Girl (Tara Middleton) emerge to reveal elements and precepts of another kind of language, another tomorrow, learned through years of discipline to be given freely in the present. Hotep’s own ARP (Akimbo Research Projects) develops through-composed and free-improvised performance based on sonification of pitch-sets derived from elemental particles. Expect the never-expected as electronics, electric guitar, celestial vocals, percussion, and violin call forth shadows of unseen worlds.
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  • Maryanne Amacher: An Introduction
    7:00 PM
    04/09/2019

    3420 Walnut St Philadelphia, PA 19104, 6th floor

    3420 Walnut St Philadelphia, PA 19104, 6th floor

    Bowerbird, in collaboration with The University of Pennsylvania’s Music Department and the Kislak Center, are pleased to present “Maryanne Amacher: An Introduction” a talk by scholar-artist Bill Dietz on the life and work of Maryanne Amacher (1938 – 2009). Featuring rarely presented archival material, the talk will illuminate Amacher’s unique methodology and studio practice.
    Maryanne Amacher’s formative years were spent in Philadelphia. She enrolled in the University of Pennsylvania in 1955, where her education was funded in part by a prestigious Senatorial Scholarship. As a music major, she studied with composer and theorist Constant Vauclain, George Rochberg and the prominent German avant-garde composer Karlheinz Stockhausen during his tenure in Philadelphia in 1964 and 1965. Alongside music classes at the University of Pennsylvania, Amacher pursued a rigorous humanities education, which included courses in literature, French language, philosophy, and journalism. Amacher’s undergraduate work in the journalism department coincided with the department’s first courses on television production and criticism (as well as the founding of the Annenberg School for Communication in 1959), and her lifelong interest in creating work for mass-media broadcast on radio and television suggests that these courses shaped her commitment to weaving perceptual experiments into everyday, domestic life.
    LOCATION INFORMATION
    Class of 1978 Orrery Pavilion
    Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
    Van Pelt-Dietrich Library Center, sixth floor
    3420 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA
    Free and open to the public (please show photo ID at entrance)
    Program duration approximately 60 mins.
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  • Adjacencies, Petra, Supreme Connections (Night One) Maryanne Amacher
    7:30 PM
    04/12/2019

    NW Corner 51st & Spruce Streets Philadelphia, PA 19139

    NW Corner 51st & Spruce Streets Philadelphia, PA 19139

    Sound, space, and psychoacoustic phenomena are explored as three different facets of Maryanne Amacher’s creative work are joined together in a single evening for the first time. The program features two of Amacher’s rare compositions including live instruments: Adjacencies (for percussion and spatialized, four-channel electronics) and Petra (for two pianos). The artistic collective Supreme Connections will also create a site-specific interpretive installation using archival audio and visual materials. Each work will be staged in a different architectural space inside the beautiful and expansive Holy Apostles and The Mediator Church.

    PROGRAM
    Supreme Connections
    performance installation by Bill Dietz, Sergei Tcherepnin, Keiko Prince, Woody Sullender, Nora Schultz, and Amy Cimini.
    Amacher: Adjacencies (1965)
    Robert Cosgrove, percussion
    Russell Greenberg, percussion
    Daniel Neumann, electronics
    Woody Sullender, electronics
    Amacher: Petra (1991)
    Marianne Schroeder, piano
    Emily Manzo, piano
    Program duration approximately 120 mins.
    This event is part of Maryanne Amacher: Perceptual Geographies.

    PROGRAM NOTES
    Maryanne Amacher (1938-2009) was a composer of large-scale fixed-duration sound installations and a highly original thinker in the areas of perception, sound spatialization, creative intelligence, and aural architecture. A collaborator with John Cage and Merce Cunningham, Amacher spent her formative years as an artist in Philadelphia, where she studied at the University of Pennsylvania with composer Karlheinz Stockhausen. She is frequently cited as a pioneer of what has come to be called sound art, although her thought and creative practice consistently challenge key assumptions about the capacities and limitations of this nascent genre.
    Though Amacher is known primarily as an electronic composer, early on she wrote a handful of pieces for classical instruments using experimental forms of notation. AUDJOINS, a Suite For Audjoined Rooms was a collection of such works, from the early to mid-’60s, for various spatially staged ensembles. Adjacencies, a graphic score for two percussionists and electronics, was written in 1965 (during her time in Philadelphia) and is the only known extant score of that series. The work directs performers by sending their microphone signals to a changing array of speakers surrounding the audience, combining otherwise distinct worlds of sound. Not performed since 1966, Lawrence Kumpf’s New York City based presenting organization Blank Forms collaborated with Amacher scholars Amy Cimini and Bill Dietz to unpack and analyze the score for its posthumous realization. The work was given its modern premiere at The Kitchen in 2017 with Ian Antonio and Russell Greenberg of the experimental piano-percussion quartet Yarn/Wire, with sound distribution by Daniel Neumann and Woody Sullender.
    Starting in the late seventies, the central focus of Amacher’s practice shifted to the site-specific transformation of architectural space, involving the measured, oblique placement of speakers behind walls and under floors to reimagine manmade structures as massive analog sound filters. Moving from the entire-building scale of her Music For Sound Joined Rooms to the Mini Sound Series, Amacher strategically incorporated a variety of visual elements as cues for suggested spatial navigation. Requiring prolonged venue access as well as considerable equipment, Amacher was almost never able to mount these costly works in the US before her death in 2009, presenting them largely in Europe and Japan. Inspired by vernacular serial formats, she emphasized that the architecturally staged pieces, as distinguished from a continuous installation or traditional concert genre, were intended as “an evolving sound work ‘to be continued.’”
    In 2012 a group of Amacher’s former collaborators took up the baton, joining forces to collectively engage with the questions of the posthumous life of their friend’s site-adaptive work. Under the name Supreme Connections (the top secret sound lab featured in Amacher’s unrealised treatment, Intelligent Life), the loose formation developed a model for realizing Amacher’s radical approach in keeping with its complex conception of “the work.” Recreating the working methodology of Amacher’s later years through conscious interpretation rather than incongruously faithful reenactments, Supreme Connections created a series of large-scale “hearing as if” installations at the Funkhaus, Tate Modern, Bienal de São Paulo, and Stedelijk Museum. With a week of 24-hour venue access at their disposal for the collective’s first-ever project in the US, this iteration of Supreme Connections is comprised of Bill Dietz, Sergei Tcherepnin, Keiko Prince, Woody Sullender, Nora Schultz, and Amy Cimini.
    Amacher’s 1991 piece Petra was originally commissioned for the ICSM World Music Days in Boswil, Switzerland. Written for two pianos, Petra is a unique example of Amacher’s late work, a direct extension of her working methodologies for electronic compositions taken into an acoustic realm that alludes to the music of Giacinto Scelsi and Galina Ustvolskaya. The piece is a sweeping, durational work based on both Amacher’s impressions of the church at Boswil and science-fiction writer Greg Bear’s short story of the same name, in which gargoyles come to life and breed with humans in a post-apocalyptic Notre Dame.
    The piece will be performed by Marianne Schroeder, who originally performed the piece alongside Amacher in 1991, and Emily Manzo. Like much of Amacher’s work, a performance of Petra is not as straightforward as it might appear—there is no definitive score but rather a series of fragments and working notes left to be deciphered. This third ever performance is an expanded version based on a newly discovered notes and scores from the Maryanne Amacher Archive.
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  • Ways of Hearing (workshop) with Supreme Connections
    1:00 PM
    04/13/2019

    NW Corner 51st & Spruce Streets Philadelphia, PA 19139

    NW Corner 51st & Spruce Streets Philadelphia, PA 19139

    Ways of Hearing is a multi-part workshop lead by the artist group Supreme Connections that explores the complexity and nuance of Maryanne Amacher’s artistic practice and her idea of “perceptual geography” as an approach to composition. These events will include in depth listening and discussion of archival audio, and the presentation of unpublished images of scores, notes, and texts selected from the Amacher Archive. The workshop is open to all, but overall group size is limited. Advanced registration is strongly encouraged.
    This program runs from 1pm to 5pm. Breaks and light refreshments will be provided.
    Today media exist which begin to mirror the sensitive range of our perceptual modes. As technologies develop to enhance the range and subtlety of our responsive energies, will the auditory arts do likewise? Will sound art explore emergent technologies to delve consciously into these expanded sensitivities? And in what ways? Taking VR (Virtual Reality 3D sonic imaging and graphics, telepresence, and cyberspace) as a point of departure, this workshop examines possibilities of individualizing sonic architectures for listeners and for spaces – an approach to composition as “perceptual geography.”
    With today’s programmable immersive technologies, scenarios can be created which focus on multiple perceptual viewpoints as we respond to auditory events. Ways of hearing — how we locate, sense and feel sonic events — are in fact the specific factors which characterize experience in immersive sonic architectures; how we particularize acoustic information to construct distinct transformative experiences. How certain sounds are to be perceived — what perceptual modes they trigger, where and how they will exist for the listener — becomes as important in shaping an aural architecture as the acoustic information: frequencies, tone colors, and rhythms.
    “Will certain sounds be locatable, seem miles away, feel close, pulsate vertically above our head, vibrate an elbow, suddenly appear in the space, dramatically disappear as though without a sound? Do we perceive the sound in the room, in our head, a great distance away: do we experience all three dimensions clearly at the same time? In the room, does the sound drift, float, fall like rain? Does it make such a clear shape in the air we seem to “see it” in front of our eyes? Is there no sound in the room at all, but we continue to hear “after-sound” as our mind is processing aural events perceived minutes ago? Do we experience sonic imaging very near, moving beside (outside and around) one ear only: “feel” patterns as they in fact, do originate and develop quite specifically inside, within our ears…
    Excerpted from Maryanne Amacher’s “MUS 352B Workshop in Electronic, Electroacoustic and Computer Music Composition” course listing at Bard College.
    ABOUT SUPREME CONNECTIONS
    In 2012 a group of Amacher’s former collaborators took up the baton, joining forces to collectively engage with the questions of the posthumous life of their friend’s site-adaptive work. Under the name SUPREME CONNECTIONS (the top secret sound lab featured in Amacher’s unrealised treatment, Intelligent Life), the loose formation developed a model for realizing Amacher’s radical approach in keeping with its complex conception of “the work.” Recreating the working methodology of Amacher’s later years through conscious interpretation rather than incongruously faithful reenactments, SUPREME CONNECTIONS created a series of large-scale “hearing as if” installations at the Funkhaus, Tate Modern, Bienal de São Paulo, and Stedelijk Museum. This iteration of SUPREME CONNECTIONS is comprised of Bill Dietz, Sergei Tcherepnin, Keiko Prince, Woody Sullender, Nora Schultz, and Amy Cimini.
  • Jamaaladeen Tacuma , Ronnie Burrage, Sumi Tanooka , Braxton Bateman
    7:00 PM
    04/13/2019

    600 North Broad Street, Philadelphia PA, 19130

    600 North Broad Street, Philadelphia PA, 19130

    THE 2019 OUTSIDERS IMPROVISED & CREATIVE MUSIC FESTIVAL April 2019
    Philadelphia PA — Jam-All Productions, led by renowned jazz bassist Jamaaladeen Tacuma, presents the fifth annual Outsiders Improvised & Creative Music Festival. Organized by Jam-All and curated by Tacuma, this year’s 5-event festival continues its mission of showcasing diverse styles of risk-taking, progressive music and groundbreaking artists in April for Philadelphia’s Jazz Appreciation Month. This year’s festival theme is “invasion of the outsiders,” celebrating the contributions of mavericks, interlopers, refugees, and strangers to the culture of music.
    The 2019 Outsiders fest begins on Saturday April 13th & Sunday the 14th at South Jazz Parlor, 600 N Broad St, Philadelphia, PA 19130 Saturday Night: Jamaaladeen Tacuma-Bass , Ronnie Burrage Drums, Sumi Tonooka- Piano, Braxton Bateman-Trumpet, Tarus Mateen- Bass will be two sets each night at 7pm and 9pm. Admission is $25 and tickets are available online through southrestaurant.com or by phone at (215) 600-0220.
  • Adjacencies, Petra, Supreme Connections (Night Two) Maryanne Amacher
    7:30 PM
    04/13/2019

    NW Corner 51st & Spruce Streets Philadelphia, PA 19139

    NW Corner 51st & Spruce Streets Philadelphia, PA 19139

    Sound, space, and psychoacoustic phenomena are explored as three different facets of Maryanne Amacher’s creative work are joined together in a single evening for the first time. The program features two of Amacher’s rare compositions including live instruments: Adjacencies (for percussion and spatialized, four-channel electronics) and Petra (for two pianos). The artistic collective Supreme Connections will also create a site-specific interpretive installation using archival audio and visual materials. Each work will be staged in a different architectural space inside the beautiful and expansive Holy Apostles and The Mediator Church.

    PROGRAM
    Supreme Connections
    performance installation by Bill Dietz, Sergei Tcherepnin, Keiko Prince, Woody Sullender, Nora Schultz, and Amy Cimini.
    Amacher: Adjacencies (1965)
    Robert Cosgrove, percussion
    Russell Greenberg, percussion
    Daniel Neumann, electronics
    Woody Sullender, electronics
    Amacher: Petra (1991)
    Marianne Schroeder, piano
    Emily Manzo, piano
    Program duration approximately 120 mins.
    This event is part of Maryanne Amacher: Perceptual Geographies.

    PROGRAM NOTES
    Maryanne Amacher (1938-2009) was a composer of large-scale fixed-duration sound installations and a highly original thinker in the areas of perception, sound spatialization, creative intelligence, and aural architecture. A collaborator with John Cage and Merce Cunningham, Amacher spent her formative years as an artist in Philadelphia, where she studied at the University of Pennsylvania with composer Karlheinz Stockhausen. She is frequently cited as a pioneer of what has come to be called sound art, although her thought and creative practice consistently challenge key assumptions about the capacities and limitations of this nascent genre.
    Though Amacher is known primarily as an electronic composer, early on she wrote a handful of pieces for classical instruments using experimental forms of notation. AUDJOINS, a Suite For Audjoined Rooms was a collection of such works, from the early to mid-’60s, for various spatially staged ensembles. Adjacencies, a graphic score for two percussionists and electronics, was written in 1965 (during her time in Philadelphia) and is the only known extant score of that series. The work directs performers by sending their microphone signals to a changing array of speakers surrounding the audience, combining otherwise distinct worlds of sound. Not performed since 1966, Lawrence Kumpf’s New York City based presenting organization Blank Forms collaborated with Amacher scholars Amy Cimini and Bill Dietz to unpack and analyze the score for its posthumous realization. The work was given its modern premiere at The Kitchen in 2017 with Ian Antonio and Russell Greenberg of the experimental piano-percussion quartet Yarn/Wire, with sound distribution by Daniel Neumann and Woody Sullender.
    Starting in the late seventies, the central focus of Amacher’s practice shifted to the site-specific transformation of architectural space, involving the measured, oblique placement of speakers behind walls and under floors to reimagine manmade structures as massive analog sound filters. Moving from the entire-building scale of her Music For Sound Joined Rooms to the Mini Sound Series, Amacher strategically incorporated a variety of visual elements as cues for suggested spatial navigation. Requiring prolonged venue access as well as considerable equipment, Amacher was almost never able to mount these costly works in the US before her death in 2009, presenting them largely in Europe and Japan. Inspired by vernacular serial formats, she emphasized that the architecturally staged pieces, as distinguished from a continuous installation or traditional concert genre, were intended as “an evolving sound work ‘to be continued.’”
    In 2012 a group of Amacher’s former collaborators took up the baton, joining forces to collectively engage with the questions of the posthumous life of their friend’s site-adaptive work. Under the name Supreme Connections (the top secret sound lab featured in Amacher’s unrealised treatment, Intelligent Life), the loose formation developed a model for realizing Amacher’s radical approach in keeping with its complex conception of “the work.” Recreating the working methodology of Amacher’s later years through conscious interpretation rather than incongruously faithful reenactments, Supreme Connections created a series of large-scale “hearing as if” installations at the Funkhaus, Tate Modern, Bienal de São Paulo, and Stedelijk Museum. With a week of 24-hour venue access at their disposal for the collective’s first-ever project in the US, this iteration of Supreme Connections is comprised of Bill Dietz, Sergei Tcherepnin, Keiko Prince, Woody Sullender, Nora Schultz, and Amy Cimini.
    Amacher’s 1991 piece Petra was originally commissioned for the ICSM World Music Days in Boswil, Switzerland. Written for two pianos, Petra is a unique example of Amacher’s late work, a direct extension of her working methodologies for electronic compositions taken into an acoustic realm that alludes to the music of Giacinto Scelsi and Galina Ustvolskaya. The piece is a sweeping, durational work based on both Amacher’s impressions of the church at Boswil and science-fiction writer Greg Bear’s short story of the same name, in which gargoyles come to life and breed with humans in a post-apocalyptic Notre Dame.
    The piece will be performed by Marianne Schroeder, who originally performed the piece alongside Amacher in 1991, and Emily Manzo. Like much of Amacher’s work, a performance of Petra is not as straightforward as it might appear—there is no definitive score but rather a series of fragments and working notes left to be deciphered. This third ever performance is an expanded version based on a newly discovered notes and scores from the Maryanne Amacher Archive.
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  • Jamaaladeen Tacuma, Oliver Lake, Kelvyn Bell, Nazir Ebo
    7:00 PM
    04/14/2019

    600 North Broad Street, Philadelphia PA, 19130

    600 North Broad Street, Philadelphia PA, 19130

    THE 2019 OUTSIDERS IMPROVISED & CREATIVE MUSIC FESTIVAL April 2019
    Philadelphia PA — Jam-All Productions, led by renowned jazz bassist Jamaaladeen Tacuma, presents the fifth annual Outsiders Improvised & Creative Music Festival. Organized by Jam-All and curated by Tacuma, this year’s 5-event festival continues its mission of showcasing diverse styles of risk-taking, progressive music and groundbreaking artists in April for Philadelphia’s Jazz Appreciation Month. This year’s festival theme is “invasion of the outsiders,” celebrating the contributions of mavericks, interlopers, refugees, and strangers to the culture of music.
    The 2019 Outsiders fest begins on Saturday and Sunday April 13th & 14th at South Jazz Parlor, 600 N Broad St, Philadelphia, PA 19130 , Sunday Night Lineup: Oliver Lake Sax, Kelvyn Bell Guitar, Nazir Ebo Drums, Jamaaladeen Tacuma will be two sets each night at 7pm and 9pm. Admission is $25 and tickets are available online through southrestaurant.com or by phone at (215) 600-0220.
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  • Xylouris-White & Elkhorn
    7:30 PM
    04/16/2019

    4014 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, United States

    4014 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, United States

    Xylouris-White:
    Xylouris-White is firmly rooted in the past and future. Playing Cretan music of original and traditional composition, the band consists of Georgios Xylouris on Cretan laouto and vocals and Jim White on drum kit. Xylouris is known and loved by Cretans and Greeks at home and abroad and has been playing professionally from age 12. Jim White is an Australian drummer known and loved throughout the world as the drummer of Dirty Three, Venom P Stinger and now Xylouris White. For the last four years these two men have been performing as Xylouris White, the culmination of 25 years of friendship forged through music and place.
    When the lute player George Xylouris was a teenager — growing up in a mountain village on Crete, not far from the Ideon Cave, where Zeus worshipers have been making pilgrimages since the end of Minoan civilization — he was working as accompanist to his father, the folkloric singer and lyrist Antonis Xylouris. When the Australian drummer Jim White was a teenager, he was playing in a Melbourne noise band called the People With Chairs Up Their Noses.
    It’s good that they’ve ended up together. Both are extraordinary musicians. From a distance, in market terms, one is a traditional artist and the other a nontraditional one. (Mr. Xylouris has mostly stayed within the music of his culture and family; since the early 1990s, Mr. White has been the drummer for the great instrumental trio Dirty Three.) But up close, during a set at Union Pool in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, on Thursday night, the difference was negligible. Onstage, as Xylouris White, they look and play like brothers.
    …It’s intense, joyous, rugged music…” – Ben Ratliff/New York Times
    Elkhorn:
    Elkhorn (Philadelphia/NYC) is a guitar duo featuring Jesse Sheppard on 12-string acoustic guitar and Drew Gardner on electric guitar. Their music digs deep into the traditions of Folk, Jazz, Blues, African, Indian, and Psychedelic music. Their latest album, Sun Cycle, is being released by Feeding Tube Records in the Spring of 2019.
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  • Made in America a film by Shirley Clarke
    6:00 PM
    04/17/2019

    738 South Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19146, USA

    738 South Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19146, USA

    The festival continues on Wednesday April 17th at the Clef Club of Jazz, 738 S Broad St, Philadelphia, PA 19146, with a 6pm screening of Ornette: Made in America, a film by Shirley Clark with a Panel Discussion featuring Denardo Coleman and members of Ornettes Prime Time Band who appear in the film. Admission is free and to reserve tickets contact The Clef Club phone: (215) 893-9912.
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  • Yasmin Williams + Daniel Bachman
    8:00 PM
    04/19/2019

    4014 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, United States

    4014 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, United States

    Bowerbird is pleased to present a double bill of fingerstyle and American primitive guitarists Yasmin Williams and Daniel Bachman.
    ABOUT THE ARTIST
    Yasmin Williams is an acoustic fingerstyle guitarist with an unorthodox, modern style of playing. Her music has been commonly described as refreshing, relaxing, and unique and has been called some of the most imaginative guitar music out today. She utilizes various techniques including alternate tunings, percussive hits, and lap tapping in her music to great effect. She has won various local talent shows, was a finalist in the Rolling Stones Young Gun guitar competition, was the Grand prize winner of New York University’s Ultra Violet Live talent show, and won the grand prize in Culpeper Has Talent. She was recently featured on NPR’s Weekend Edition Saturday show.
    She grew up in northern Virginia where various genres of music from smooth jazz to hip-hop were played in her household. She was introduced to the guitar after playing the video game Guitar Hero 2 and became interested in playing the guitar in 2009. She begged her parents to buy her a real electric guitar and once she received her first guitar and amplifier, she taught herself how to play the guitar by ear. After a few years of playing the electric guitar, she taught herself how to play the bass guitar, 12 string guitar, and classical guitar before eventually deciding to switch her focus to the acoustic guitar because of the instrument’s versatility. While in high school, she released her first EP Serendipity in 2012, which she recorded and mixed herself.
    She graduated from New York University with a BM in Music Theory and Composition in December 2017. Her first album, Unwind, was released on May 4, 2018 and is available on all major streaming services and Bandcamp. The album has charted highly on several Amazon and iTunes charts including top paid albums, and charted at #15 on Billboard’s Heatseekers chart.

    Daniel Bachman emerged as a guitar wonderkid at the beginning of this decade, quietly asserting himself as the heir to John Fahey’s throne with his prolific and deeply traditional approach to American Primitive music. While others who rode the wave of the instrumental guitar resurgence turned their six-string dexterity to modern interpretations of the style, Bachman has steadfastly mined the limitations of what ghosts can be summoned from his acoustic instruments.
    Although he had been touring from the age of 17, Bachman “arrived” around 2015 with nods from NPR and Rolling Stone. His charm was found in his traditional approach: a young kid from Fredericksberg, VA paying homage to the deep roots of American music with album titles like Jesus, I’m A Sinner. But there was nothing contrived about his approach. Bachman is not only a proponent of the American folk tradition, but also a true scholar of it, and his constant stream of releases (he’s released 11 records between 2011 and 2016) and near-endless tour schedule on both sides of the Atlantic added to his credentials as a musician cut from the old mold that was otherwise stamped out by global record conglomerates, release cycles, and the homogenizing reach of the internet.
    While Bachman’s prolific streak ended in 2017 — it was the first time since he was 21 that he didn’t release a record (let alone two or three) — he made his triumphant return this year with The Morning Star. The album, out now on Three Lobed Recordings, is a masterstroke from the artist, retaining everything he stands for and supplanting it with field recordings and radio sermons he has amassed over the years, placed in such a way to make it abundantly clear which side of American politics he stands. It’s not a departure from the American Primitive hallmarks — parts of the album were literally recorded on his porch — yet the record wonderfully captures the zeitgeist, enlivening the best parts of our traditions while remaining progressive.  (Tiny Mix Tapes)
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  • Jamaaladeen Tacuma, WIl Calhoun & Marc Ribot
    7:00 PM
    04/21/2019

    1100 Chestnut Street Philadelphia, PA 19107

    1100 Chestnut Street Philadelphia, PA 19107

    Outsiders Improvised & Creative Music Festival Presents: Synergy Effect: Jamaaladeen Tacuma, Will Calhoun (of Living Colour), Marc Ribot These three need no introductions a first time meeting of 3 powerhouse improvisers sharing the stage for the first time together. Tacuma has collaborated with both in separate configurations and understands the Synergy that take effect when the three take the stage together. This will be a monumental event.
    Akeem’s Razor ft. Matthew Stuart (trumpet- Streetlight Manifesto) warms the stage
    Sun, April 21, 2019 Doors: 6:00 pm / Show: 7:00 pm $16 Advance / $20 Day of Show
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  • Heart Of The Ghost & MJ/Engle/Capecchi trio
    8:00 PM
    04/23/2019

    2113 East York Street, Philadelphia, PA 19125, USA

    2113 East York Street, Philadelphia, PA 19125, USA

    Heart Of The Ghost:
    For the past two years, few improvisation units have been as omnipresent in the D.C. area as Heart of the Ghost. For good reason: The trio of alto saxophonist Jarrett Gilgore, bassist Luke Stewart, and percussionist Ian McColm is something of a trinity of the finest free jazz improvisers in the region. If you’ve seen Heart of the Ghost in concert, then you know—Gilgore, Stewart, and McColm’s performances feel like a kind of séance, with the trio locked into a musical conversation with one another.
    Though Gilgore’s skronked-out sax wailings anchor the tracks, no one part is greater than the sum of the whole. McColm’s inventive percussion techniques feel like a rhythm from another world, and Stewart—easily one of the most prolific and talented bassists in the region, if not the entire country—takes his instrument to new dimensions.” – Matt Cohen/Washington Citypaper
    “…But free music is about right now, wherever you are at, anyplace that the right players get together and play. If you have a chance to hear Washington, D.C. trio Heart of the Ghost, rest assured that you’ve found another portal into the creative vortex that spontaneously lifts hearts, minds and bands off the stand. Their freewheeling improvisations tap into the same defiant spirit decanted by Mingus and the Minutemen, which is to say that the freedom is in the playing, but it’s also a conscious reaction to the ways in which people are not free. You can hear protest in alto saxophonist Jarrett Gilgore’s brays and peppery interjections. You can hear mourning and defiant creation in bassist Luke Stewart’s continually shifting frameworks of woody-toned dark motion. And you can hear the moment-to-moment dance necessary to keep it moving or just keep standing in drummer Ian McColm’s shifting tonal surfaces and rhythmic cascades.”-Bill Meyer/Dusted
    Veronica MJ/Matt Engle/Dan Capecchi trio:
    Veronica Jurkiewicz (MJ) is a violist, violinist, and vocalist based in Philadelphia.  She is drawn to sound involving the intersection of experimental, improvisational, and traditional practice.
    Veronica is often seen playing in a string quartet performing new/experimental music, singing Bach, improvising alongside Afro-Cuban percussionists, interpreting new music, and bringing chamber music to the people with Classical Revolution Philly.
    Matt Engle (bass) has been an active member of the Philadelphia creative and improvised music scene for over 15 years. He is a member of the Dan Blacksberg Trio, Bobby Zankel small group, and Sonic Liberation Front among others.
    Born and raised in the Twin Cities of Minnesota (St. Paul and Minneapolis), percussionist Dan Capecchi moved to Philadelphia in the fall of 2002, where he became increasingly interested and active in the world of improvised music. Dan has been involved with Shot x Shot, Peter Robbins, Jeff Baumeister, and Toshi Makahara as well as
    short term engagements with Susie Ibarra and others.
    This event made possible by a donation from Martha Bar Kensington.
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  • SW/Lisa Bella Donna/Keir Neuringer trio & Tadzio
    7:30 PM
    04/24/2019

    2152 E Norris St, Philadelphia, PA 19125, USA

    2152 E Norris St, Philadelphia, PA 19125, USA

    SW/Lisa Bella Donna/Keir Neuringer trio:
    This concert reunites SW, the brilliant improvising pianist from Leipzig, Germany, with two of her collaborators in the States. SW first worked together with Columbus, Ohio-based drummer, synth, and electronics artist Lisa Bella Donna in 2008. Their connection was strong and immediate, inspiring both a duo recording (‘Arrival’ on the label Sea of Tranquility) and multiple tours through the US Midwest and Central Europe. SW first performed with Philadelphia-based saxophonist and composer Keir Neuringer in 2012. Since then they have performed together annually in the US and Europe, including a performance at the Konfrontations Festival in their trio with veteran free-jazz drummer Willi Kellers. This will be the first meeting of Bella Donna and Neuringer.
    SW – piano
    Lisa Bella Donna – synth, drums
    Keir Neuringer – farfisa, saxophone
    Tadzio:
    Tadzio is an ensemble of musicians who share an interest in creating evocative sonic landscapes that blend warm acoustic tones (harp, piano, flute, percussion) with electronic instrumentation with an uneasy lushness that recalls both the soaring verticality of a symphony hall and the distorted hum of a basement noise show.
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  • Outsiders Creative & Improvised Music Festival Grand Finale
    6:00 PM
    04/26/2019

    3500 Lancaster Ave Philadelphia, PA 19104

    3500 Lancaster Ave Philadelphia, PA 19104

    Philadelphia PA — Jam-All Productions, led by renowned jazz bassist Jamaaladeen Tacuma, presents the fifth annual Outsiders Improvised & Creative Music Festival. Organized by Jam-All and curated by Tacuma, this year’s 5-event festival continues its mission of showcasing diverse styles of risk-taking, progressive music and groundbreaking artists in April for Philadelphia’s Jazz Appreciation Month. This year’s festival theme is “invasion of the outsiders,” celebrating the contributions of mavericks, interlopers, refugees, and strangers to the culture of music.
    A Grand Finale highlighting Philadelphia’s contributions to Improvised & Creative Music will take place Friday April 26th at the Community Education Center (CEC), 3500 Lancaster Ave, Philadelphia, PA 19104; Lineup featuring Gary Bartz (Sax), Fay Victor (Vocals), Jamaaladeen Tacuma (Bass), New Ghost Ensemble, Retrograde, Marco Oppedisano (Guitar) and more . Admission is $25 and tickets are available at Eventbrite and CEC phone: (215) 387-1911.
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