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April 07 - April 13
  • 07
    04/07/2019
    No events
  • 08
    04/08/2019
    No events
  • 09
    04/09/2019

    Maryanne Amacher: An Introduction

    7:00 PM
    04/09/2019
    3420 Walnut St Philadelphia, PA 19104, 6th floor
    3420 Walnut St Philadelphia, PA 19104, 6th floor
    Bowerbird, in collaboration with The University of Pennsylvania’s Music Department and the Kislak Center, are pleased to present “Maryanne Amacher: An Introduction” a talk by scholar-artist Bill Dietz on the life and work of Maryanne Amacher (1938 – 2009). Featuring rarely presented archival material, the talk will illuminate Amacher’s unique methodology and studio practice.
    Maryanne Amacher’s formative years were spent in Philadelphia. She enrolled in the University of Pennsylvania in 1955, where her education was funded in part by a prestigious Senatorial Scholarship. As a music major, she studied with composer and theorist Constant Vauclain, George Rochberg and the prominent German avant-garde composer Karlheinz Stockhausen during his tenure in Philadelphia in 1964 and 1965. Alongside music classes at the University of Pennsylvania, Amacher pursued a rigorous humanities education, which included courses in literature, French language, philosophy, and journalism. Amacher’s undergraduate work in the journalism department coincided with the department’s first courses on television production and criticism (as well as the founding of the Annenberg School for Communication in 1959), and her lifelong interest in creating work for mass-media broadcast on radio and television suggests that these courses shaped her commitment to weaving perceptual experiments into everyday, domestic life.
    LOCATION INFORMATION
    Class of 1978 Orrery Pavilion
    Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
    Van Pelt-Dietrich Library Center, sixth floor
    3420 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA
    Free and open to the public (please show photo ID at entrance)
    Program duration approximately 60 mins.
  • 10
    04/10/2019
    No events
  • 11
    04/11/2019
    No events
  • 12
    04/12/2019

    Adjacencies, Petra, Supreme Connections (Night One) Maryanne Amacher

    7:30 PM
    04/12/2019
    NW Corner 51st & Spruce Streets Philadelphia, PA 19139
    NW Corner 51st & Spruce Streets Philadelphia, PA 19139
    Sound, space, and psychoacoustic phenomena are explored as three different facets of Maryanne Amacher’s creative work are joined together in a single evening for the first time. The program features two of Amacher’s rare compositions including live instruments: Adjacencies (for percussion and spatialized, four-channel electronics) and Petra (for two pianos). The artistic collective Supreme Connections will also create a site-specific interpretive installation using archival audio and visual materials. Each work will be staged in a different architectural space inside the beautiful and expansive Holy Apostles and The Mediator Church.

    PROGRAM
    Supreme Connections
    performance installation by Bill Dietz, Sergei Tcherepnin, Keiko Prince, Woody Sullender, Nora Schultz, and Amy Cimini.
    Amacher: Adjacencies (1965)
    Robert Cosgrove, percussion
    Russell Greenberg, percussion
    Daniel Neumann, electronics
    Woody Sullender, electronics
    Amacher: Petra (1991)
    Marianne Schroeder, piano
    Emily Manzo, piano
    Program duration approximately 120 mins.
    This event is part of Maryanne Amacher: Perceptual Geographies.

    PROGRAM NOTES
    Maryanne Amacher (1938-2009) was a composer of large-scale fixed-duration sound installations and a highly original thinker in the areas of perception, sound spatialization, creative intelligence, and aural architecture. A collaborator with John Cage and Merce Cunningham, Amacher spent her formative years as an artist in Philadelphia, where she studied at the University of Pennsylvania with composer Karlheinz Stockhausen. She is frequently cited as a pioneer of what has come to be called sound art, although her thought and creative practice consistently challenge key assumptions about the capacities and limitations of this nascent genre.
    Though Amacher is known primarily as an electronic composer, early on she wrote a handful of pieces for classical instruments using experimental forms of notation. AUDJOINS, a Suite For Audjoined Rooms was a collection of such works, from the early to mid-’60s, for various spatially staged ensembles. Adjacencies, a graphic score for two percussionists and electronics, was written in 1965 (during her time in Philadelphia) and is the only known extant score of that series. The work directs performers by sending their microphone signals to a changing array of speakers surrounding the audience, combining otherwise distinct worlds of sound. Not performed since 1966, Lawrence Kumpf’s New York City based presenting organization Blank Forms collaborated with Amacher scholars Amy Cimini and Bill Dietz to unpack and analyze the score for its posthumous realization. The work was given its modern premiere at The Kitchen in 2017 with Ian Antonio and Russell Greenberg of the experimental piano-percussion quartet Yarn/Wire, with sound distribution by Daniel Neumann and Woody Sullender.
    Starting in the late seventies, the central focus of Amacher’s practice shifted to the site-specific transformation of architectural space, involving the measured, oblique placement of speakers behind walls and under floors to reimagine manmade structures as massive analog sound filters. Moving from the entire-building scale of her Music For Sound Joined Rooms to the Mini Sound Series, Amacher strategically incorporated a variety of visual elements as cues for suggested spatial navigation. Requiring prolonged venue access as well as considerable equipment, Amacher was almost never able to mount these costly works in the US before her death in 2009, presenting them largely in Europe and Japan. Inspired by vernacular serial formats, she emphasized that the architecturally staged pieces, as distinguished from a continuous installation or traditional concert genre, were intended as “an evolving sound work ‘to be continued.’”
    In 2012 a group of Amacher’s former collaborators took up the baton, joining forces to collectively engage with the questions of the posthumous life of their friend’s site-adaptive work. Under the name Supreme Connections (the top secret sound lab featured in Amacher’s unrealised treatment, Intelligent Life), the loose formation developed a model for realizing Amacher’s radical approach in keeping with its complex conception of “the work.” Recreating the working methodology of Amacher’s later years through conscious interpretation rather than incongruously faithful reenactments, Supreme Connections created a series of large-scale “hearing as if” installations at the Funkhaus, Tate Modern, Bienal de São Paulo, and Stedelijk Museum. With a week of 24-hour venue access at their disposal for the collective’s first-ever project in the US, this iteration of Supreme Connections is comprised of Bill Dietz, Sergei Tcherepnin, Keiko Prince, Woody Sullender, Nora Schultz, and Amy Cimini.
    Amacher’s 1991 piece Petra was originally commissioned for the ICSM World Music Days in Boswil, Switzerland. Written for two pianos, Petra is a unique example of Amacher’s late work, a direct extension of her working methodologies for electronic compositions taken into an acoustic realm that alludes to the music of Giacinto Scelsi and Galina Ustvolskaya. The piece is a sweeping, durational work based on both Amacher’s impressions of the church at Boswil and science-fiction writer Greg Bear’s short story of the same name, in which gargoyles come to life and breed with humans in a post-apocalyptic Notre Dame.
    The piece will be performed by Marianne Schroeder, who originally performed the piece alongside Amacher in 1991, and Emily Manzo. Like much of Amacher’s work, a performance of Petra is not as straightforward as it might appear—there is no definitive score but rather a series of fragments and working notes left to be deciphered. This third ever performance is an expanded version based on a newly discovered notes and scores from the Maryanne Amacher Archive.
  • 13
    04/13/2019

    Ways of Hearing (workshop) with Supreme Connections

    1:00 PM
    04/13/2019
    NW Corner 51st & Spruce Streets Philadelphia, PA 19139
    NW Corner 51st & Spruce Streets Philadelphia, PA 19139
    Ways of Hearing is a multi-part workshop lead by the artist group Supreme Connections that explores the complexity and nuance of Maryanne Amacher’s artistic practice and her idea of “perceptual geography” as an approach to composition. These events will include in depth listening and discussion of archival audio, and the presentation of unpublished images of scores, notes, and texts selected from the Amacher Archive. The workshop is open to all, but overall group size is limited. Advanced registration is strongly encouraged.
    This program runs from 1pm to 5pm. Breaks and light refreshments will be provided.
    Today media exist which begin to mirror the sensitive range of our perceptual modes. As technologies develop to enhance the range and subtlety of our responsive energies, will the auditory arts do likewise? Will sound art explore emergent technologies to delve consciously into these expanded sensitivities? And in what ways? Taking VR (Virtual Reality 3D sonic imaging and graphics, telepresence, and cyberspace) as a point of departure, this workshop examines possibilities of individualizing sonic architectures for listeners and for spaces – an approach to composition as “perceptual geography.”
    With today’s programmable immersive technologies, scenarios can be created which focus on multiple perceptual viewpoints as we respond to auditory events. Ways of hearing — how we locate, sense and feel sonic events — are in fact the specific factors which characterize experience in immersive sonic architectures; how we particularize acoustic information to construct distinct transformative experiences. How certain sounds are to be perceived — what perceptual modes they trigger, where and how they will exist for the listener — becomes as important in shaping an aural architecture as the acoustic information: frequencies, tone colors, and rhythms.
    “Will certain sounds be locatable, seem miles away, feel close, pulsate vertically above our head, vibrate an elbow, suddenly appear in the space, dramatically disappear as though without a sound? Do we perceive the sound in the room, in our head, a great distance away: do we experience all three dimensions clearly at the same time? In the room, does the sound drift, float, fall like rain? Does it make such a clear shape in the air we seem to “see it” in front of our eyes? Is there no sound in the room at all, but we continue to hear “after-sound” as our mind is processing aural events perceived minutes ago? Do we experience sonic imaging very near, moving beside (outside and around) one ear only: “feel” patterns as they in fact, do originate and develop quite specifically inside, within our ears…
    Excerpted from Maryanne Amacher’s “MUS 352B Workshop in Electronic, Electroacoustic and Computer Music Composition” course listing at Bard College.
    ABOUT SUPREME CONNECTIONS
    In 2012 a group of Amacher’s former collaborators took up the baton, joining forces to collectively engage with the questions of the posthumous life of their friend’s site-adaptive work. Under the name SUPREME CONNECTIONS (the top secret sound lab featured in Amacher’s unrealised treatment, Intelligent Life), the loose formation developed a model for realizing Amacher’s radical approach in keeping with its complex conception of “the work.” Recreating the working methodology of Amacher’s later years through conscious interpretation rather than incongruously faithful reenactments, SUPREME CONNECTIONS created a series of large-scale “hearing as if” installations at the Funkhaus, Tate Modern, Bienal de São Paulo, and Stedelijk Museum. This iteration of SUPREME CONNECTIONS is comprised of Bill Dietz, Sergei Tcherepnin, Keiko Prince, Woody Sullender, Nora Schultz, and Amy Cimini.

    Jamaaladeen Tacuma , Ronnie Burrage, Sumi Tanooka , Braxton Bateman

    7:00 PM
    04/13/2019
    600 North Broad Street, Philadelphia PA, 19130
    600 North Broad Street, Philadelphia PA, 19130
    THE 2019 OUTSIDERS IMPROVISED & CREATIVE MUSIC FESTIVAL April 2019
    Philadelphia PA — Jam-All Productions, led by renowned jazz bassist Jamaaladeen Tacuma, presents the fifth annual Outsiders Improvised & Creative Music Festival. Organized by Jam-All and curated by Tacuma, this year’s 5-event festival continues its mission of showcasing diverse styles of risk-taking, progressive music and groundbreaking artists in April for Philadelphia’s Jazz Appreciation Month. This year’s festival theme is “invasion of the outsiders,” celebrating the contributions of mavericks, interlopers, refugees, and strangers to the culture of music.
    The 2019 Outsiders fest begins on Saturday April 13th & Sunday the 14th at South Jazz Parlor, 600 N Broad St, Philadelphia, PA 19130 Saturday Night: Jamaaladeen Tacuma-Bass , Ronnie Burrage Drums, Sumi Tonooka- Piano, Braxton Bateman-Trumpet, Tarus Mateen- Bass will be two sets each night at 7pm and 9pm. Admission is $25 and tickets are available online through southrestaurant.com or by phone at (215) 600-0220.

    Adjacencies, Petra, Supreme Connections (Night Two) Maryanne Amacher

    7:30 PM
    04/13/2019
    NW Corner 51st & Spruce Streets Philadelphia, PA 19139
    NW Corner 51st & Spruce Streets Philadelphia, PA 19139
    Sound, space, and psychoacoustic phenomena are explored as three different facets of Maryanne Amacher’s creative work are joined together in a single evening for the first time. The program features two of Amacher’s rare compositions including live instruments: Adjacencies (for percussion and spatialized, four-channel electronics) and Petra (for two pianos). The artistic collective Supreme Connections will also create a site-specific interpretive installation using archival audio and visual materials. Each work will be staged in a different architectural space inside the beautiful and expansive Holy Apostles and The Mediator Church.

    PROGRAM
    Supreme Connections
    performance installation by Bill Dietz, Sergei Tcherepnin, Keiko Prince, Woody Sullender, Nora Schultz, and Amy Cimini.
    Amacher: Adjacencies (1965)
    Robert Cosgrove, percussion
    Russell Greenberg, percussion
    Daniel Neumann, electronics
    Woody Sullender, electronics
    Amacher: Petra (1991)
    Marianne Schroeder, piano
    Emily Manzo, piano
    Program duration approximately 120 mins.
    This event is part of Maryanne Amacher: Perceptual Geographies.

    PROGRAM NOTES
    Maryanne Amacher (1938-2009) was a composer of large-scale fixed-duration sound installations and a highly original thinker in the areas of perception, sound spatialization, creative intelligence, and aural architecture. A collaborator with John Cage and Merce Cunningham, Amacher spent her formative years as an artist in Philadelphia, where she studied at the University of Pennsylvania with composer Karlheinz Stockhausen. She is frequently cited as a pioneer of what has come to be called sound art, although her thought and creative practice consistently challenge key assumptions about the capacities and limitations of this nascent genre.
    Though Amacher is known primarily as an electronic composer, early on she wrote a handful of pieces for classical instruments using experimental forms of notation. AUDJOINS, a Suite For Audjoined Rooms was a collection of such works, from the early to mid-’60s, for various spatially staged ensembles. Adjacencies, a graphic score for two percussionists and electronics, was written in 1965 (during her time in Philadelphia) and is the only known extant score of that series. The work directs performers by sending their microphone signals to a changing array of speakers surrounding the audience, combining otherwise distinct worlds of sound. Not performed since 1966, Lawrence Kumpf’s New York City based presenting organization Blank Forms collaborated with Amacher scholars Amy Cimini and Bill Dietz to unpack and analyze the score for its posthumous realization. The work was given its modern premiere at The Kitchen in 2017 with Ian Antonio and Russell Greenberg of the experimental piano-percussion quartet Yarn/Wire, with sound distribution by Daniel Neumann and Woody Sullender.
    Starting in the late seventies, the central focus of Amacher’s practice shifted to the site-specific transformation of architectural space, involving the measured, oblique placement of speakers behind walls and under floors to reimagine manmade structures as massive analog sound filters. Moving from the entire-building scale of her Music For Sound Joined Rooms to the Mini Sound Series, Amacher strategically incorporated a variety of visual elements as cues for suggested spatial navigation. Requiring prolonged venue access as well as considerable equipment, Amacher was almost never able to mount these costly works in the US before her death in 2009, presenting them largely in Europe and Japan. Inspired by vernacular serial formats, she emphasized that the architecturally staged pieces, as distinguished from a continuous installation or traditional concert genre, were intended as “an evolving sound work ‘to be continued.’”
    In 2012 a group of Amacher’s former collaborators took up the baton, joining forces to collectively engage with the questions of the posthumous life of their friend’s site-adaptive work. Under the name Supreme Connections (the top secret sound lab featured in Amacher’s unrealised treatment, Intelligent Life), the loose formation developed a model for realizing Amacher’s radical approach in keeping with its complex conception of “the work.” Recreating the working methodology of Amacher’s later years through conscious interpretation rather than incongruously faithful reenactments, Supreme Connections created a series of large-scale “hearing as if” installations at the Funkhaus, Tate Modern, Bienal de São Paulo, and Stedelijk Museum. With a week of 24-hour venue access at their disposal for the collective’s first-ever project in the US, this iteration of Supreme Connections is comprised of Bill Dietz, Sergei Tcherepnin, Keiko Prince, Woody Sullender, Nora Schultz, and Amy Cimini.
    Amacher’s 1991 piece Petra was originally commissioned for the ICSM World Music Days in Boswil, Switzerland. Written for two pianos, Petra is a unique example of Amacher’s late work, a direct extension of her working methodologies for electronic compositions taken into an acoustic realm that alludes to the music of Giacinto Scelsi and Galina Ustvolskaya. The piece is a sweeping, durational work based on both Amacher’s impressions of the church at Boswil and science-fiction writer Greg Bear’s short story of the same name, in which gargoyles come to life and breed with humans in a post-apocalyptic Notre Dame.
    The piece will be performed by Marianne Schroeder, who originally performed the piece alongside Amacher in 1991, and Emily Manzo. Like much of Amacher’s work, a performance of Petra is not as straightforward as it might appear—there is no definitive score but rather a series of fragments and working notes left to be deciphered. This third ever performance is an expanded version based on a newly discovered notes and scores from the Maryanne Amacher Archive.
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