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  • Encounters at The Mothership Night 1
    8:00 PM-11:00 PM
    02/07/2019

    602 S. 52nd St, Philadelphia, PA 19143, USA

    602 S. 52nd St, Philadelphia, PA 19143, USA

    Dan Blacksberg Solo
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    OUT OF HEAVEN

    Susan Alcorn – Pedal Steel
    Dan Blacksberg – Trombone
    Ashley Tini – Mallets
    Matt Stein – Bass
    Michael Szekely – Drums

    Music will start promptly at 8:15!
    Tickets are $15 at the door!
    The Mothership is located at 602 South 52nd St.

    Dan Blacksberg here! I’m proud to present ENCOUNTERS @ The Mothership! Encounters is a 4-day concert series of solo compositions and new groups playing new original and improvised music composed and curated by me.

    For the first night of the series I will be performing a set of solo trombone music followed by the premiere of a new group, Out of Heaven! Out of Heaven features the amazing Pedal Steel virtuoso Susan Alcorn from Baltmore as well as Philadelphians Ashley Tini (Jo Nelson, Bowerbird’s Zwei Mann Orchester, Unseen Rain) Matt Stein (Stardusters, Unseen Rain), and Michael Szekely (Dan Blacksberg Trio, Stardusters, Unseen Rain).

    About Susan:

    One of the world’s premiere exponents of her instrument, Susan Alcorn has taken the pedal steel guitar far beyond its traditional role in country music. Having first paid her dues in Texas country & western bands, she began to expand the vocabulary of her instrument through her study of 20th century classical music, visionary jazz, and world musics.

    Though known primarily for her solo work, she has collaborated with numerous artists including Pauline Oliveros, Chris Cutler, Joe McPhee, Ken Vandermark, Nate Wooley, Ingrid Laubrock and Leila Bourdreuil, Evan Parker, Michael Formanek, Zane Campbell, and Mary Halvorson among others.

    In 2016, she was voted “Best Other Instrument” by the International Critics Poll. In 2017 she received the Baker Artist Award, and in 2018, along with saxophonist Joe McPhee, she was the the 1st recipient of the Instant Award in Improvised Music.

    https://danblacksberg.com/

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  • Encounters at The Mothership Night 2
    8:00 PM-11:00 PM
    02/08/2019

    602 S. 52nd St, Philadelphia, PA 19143, USA

    602 S. 52nd St, Philadelphia, PA 19143, USA

    Veronica MJ Solo
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    SLIDING FRICTION

    Susan Alcorn – Pedal Steel
    Julius Masri – Keyboards
    Dan Blacksberg – Trombone
    Temple University’s Boyer College Electroacoustic Ensemble Project (BEEP)

    Music will start promptly at 8:15!
    Tickets are $15 at the door!
    The Mothership is located at 602 South 52nd St.

    ENCOUNTERS @ The Mothership Night Two begins with Veronica MJ (Prometheus Chamber Orchestra, Arcana New Music Ensemble) performing a new piece of mine for solo violin. She’ll be followed by SLIDING FRICTION, an electroacoustic game piece once again featuring Baltimore’s Susan Alcorn on pedal steel alongside circuit-bent keyboard maestro Julius Masri (Night Raids, Ominous Cloud), the electronic-orchestra stylings of BEEP, plus myself on trombone.

    About Veronica MJ:

    Veronica Jurkiewicz is a violist, violinist, and vocalist based in Philadelphia. She is drawn to sound involving the intersection of experimental, improvisational, and traditional practice.

    Veronica is often seen playing with her string quartet, the Bismuth Quartet, performing new/experimental music, singing Bach and new music with groups like the Crossing, improvising alongside Afro-Cuban percussionists, interpreting new music with groups like Bowerbird’s Arcana Ensemble, and bringing chamber music to the people with Classical Revolution Philly.

    About BEEP:

    The Boyer College Electroacoustic Ensemble Project—BEEP—is a group for electroacoustic music creation in a collaborative environment. Founded in 2013 by Dr. Adam Vidiksis at Temple University, BEEP embraces a variety of aesthetics, from EDM to the avant-garde. We function in varied modalities: from a laptop orchestra, to fusion of computers and traditional instruments, to an electronic music band. BEEP uses the laptop orchestra model, “an ensemble of computer-based meta-instruments,” as but one of many possible modes of music making using computers and other electronics.

    Our main goal as an ensemble is to explore new musical paths and new technologies by uniting people of varying and complementary skill sets in the discovery of new possibilities of creating sound. BEEP also aims to promote expressive music making and musical vocabulary, increase technological literacy among its participants and audience, to encourage a culture of code literacy and computer competency hand-in-hand with critical and independent thinking, and to perform the ever-expanding repertory of electronic music.

    We believe that the integration of electronics in traditional music is one of many pathways forward for new music in our future. For performers, it is integral to harness the power of computer technology in order to have a strong online presence and be able to perform a large part of the music being written today. For composers, music technology makes itself evident in the writing process with engraving software and sequencers, but there is a clear creative advantage to be found in learning the benefits of integrating electronic aspects into developing pieces. For educators and music therapists, there is vast, largely unexplored potential in numerous programs being constantly written and coded for electronics that could have success in the classroom and in the therapy field. The potential is limitless when one has the tools to create sound from scratch, and BEEP strives to spread that potential as far as it can go.
    BEEP’s programming carries wide appeal, enjoyable for everyone from the seasoned electronics aficionado to the casual radio listener. All our audiences need are open ears and open minds—let us show you how it’s BEEPin’ done.

    https://danblacksberg.com/

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  • Encounters at The Mothership Night 3
    8:00 PM-11:00 PM
    02/09/2019

    602 S. 52nd St, Philadelphia, PA 19143, USA

    602 S. 52nd St, Philadelphia, PA 19143, USA

    Marshall Allen – Alto Saxophone, EWI
    Danny Ray Thompson – Flute, Baritone Saxophone
    Dan Blacksberg – Trombone
    Nick Millevoi – Guitar
    Luke Stewart -Bass
    Nazir Ebo – Drums

    Music will start promptly at 8:15!
    Tickets are $15 at the door!
    The Mothership is located at 602 South 52nd St.

    ENCOUNTERS @ The Mothership Night Three is going to be an all-out, all-star affair. Legendary saxophonists Marshall Allen (alto, EWI) and Danny Ray Thompson (baritone, flute) of the Sun Ra Arkestra will grace the stage alongside the next generation of heavy jazz shredders: Philadelphians Nick Millevoi on guitar (Many Arms, Desertion Trio, Archer Spade), Nazir Ebo (who has collaborated with everyone from Jamaaladeen Tacuma to Wynton Marsalis) on drums, and myself on trombone. Rounding out the group is Washington DC’s premier ambassador of free jazz and upright bass mastery, Luke Stewart (Irreversible Entanglements, Fay Victor, Laughing Man).

    About Marshall Allen:
    Marshall Belford Allen, alto saxophonist, multi-instrumentalist, composer, bandleader, and arranger, was born May 25, 1924 in Louisville, Kentucky and started clarinet lessons at age 10. At 18, he enlisted in the Army’s 92nd Infantry (renowned as the Buffalo Soldiers), playing clarinet and alto saxophone in the 17th Division Special Service Band. Stationed in Paris during World War II, he played with pianist Art Simmons and saxophonist Don Byas, and he toured and recorded with James Moody during the late ’40’s. Upon honorable discharge, Mr. Allen enrolled in the Paris Conservatory of Music, studying clarinet with Delacluse. Returning to the States in 1951, Marshall settled in Chicago, where he led his own bands, playing in clubs and dance halls, while writing his own music and arrangements, as he continues to do today.

    During the mid-’50’s, Marshall met Sun Ra and became a student of his precepts. After joining the Sun Ra Arkestra in 1958, Marshall Allen led Sun Ra’s formidable reed section for over 40 years (a role akin to the position of Johnny Hodges in the Duke Ellington orchestra). Marshall Allen lived, rehearsed, toured and recorded with Sun Ra almost exclusively for much of his musical career, leading the reed section during the time that the Sun Ra Arkestra won the “Downbeat” polls as number-one big band in 1988 and 1989. As a featured soloist with the Arkestra, Marshall pioneered the avante-garde jazz movement of the early ’60’s, expanding a style rooted in Johnny Hodges and Don Byas, and influencing all leading avante-garde saxophonists thereafter. During this time, Marshall also invented a woodwind instrument he called the “morrow,” utilizing a saxophone mouthpiece attached to an open-hole wooden body. (This instrument is currently being marketed under another name, as Marshall never secured a patent on his invention).

    Marshall Allen was one of the first jazz musicians to play traditional African music and what is now called “world music,” working frequently with Olatunji and his Drums of Passion. In fact, Marshall is most likely the sole jazz musician who builds and plays the kora (a popular West African multi-stringed instrument), and he has been a major factor in its introduction to American audiences, as well as the world at large.
    Marshall Allen is featured on over 200 Sun Ra releases, as well as appearing as special guest soloist in concert and on recordings with such diverse groups as NRBQ, Phish, Sonic Youth, Diggable Planets, Terry Adams, and Medeski, Martin & Wood.

    Perhaps most significantly, Marshall Allen assumed the helm of the Sun Ra Arkestra in 1995 after the ascension of Sun Ra in 1993 and John Gilmore in 1995. Mr. Allen continues to reside at the Sun Ra Residence in Philadelphia, composing, writing and arranging for the Arkestra much like his mentor, totally committed to a life of discipline centered totally on the study, research, and further development of Sun Ra’s musical precepts.

    Marshall maintains the Sun Ra residence as a living museum dedicated to the compilation, restoration and preservation of Sun Ra’s music, memorabilia, and artifacts. Marshall has launched the Sun Ra Arkestra into a dimension beyond that of mere “ghost” band by writing fresh arrangements of Sun Ra’s music, as well as composing new music for the Arkestra. He works unceasingly to keep the big-band tradition alive, reworking arrangements of the music of Fletcher Henderson and Jimmie Lunceford for the Arkestra to play, along with many other American standards.

    Marshall Allen is recognized all over the world as the premier avant-garde saxophonist, appearing in solo concert in London in 1995, duet with Terry Adams in 1997 in Canada, and featured in articles in “JazzTimes” (12/02), “Signal to Noise” Magazine, and innumerable other music magazines and radio and TV interviews. He is frequently called upon to give master classes, lectures, and demonstrations of Sun Ra’s musical precepts, and he Keeps himself accessible to all who have an interest in Sun Ra’s legacy.

    About Danny Ray Thompson:

    Danny Ray Thompson arrived on the planet 10/01/1947 in New York City. Moved to Los Angeles with Family Graduated La High School in 65. Played music in High School Band and with various youth bands there. Moved back to Harlem and studied for a year at night school Julliard School of Music. Studied with Garvin Bushell Flute and Alto sax, studied briefly with James Spaulding . First professional gig with Babatunde Olatungi in 66, there met Marshall Allen and John Gilmore, studied Alto and Flute with Marshall Allen. Met Sun Ra through them. Joined the band in 67. Moved to Philadelphia with Sun Ra in 68. Became Arkestra Manager in 81 and remained in that position till 89. I play Baritone,Alto sax’s, Flute,Percussions. Took a brief leave of absence for 7 years. Rejoined the band in 2002. Still with the Sun Ra Arkestra at this time. Influences Sun Ra, Marshall Allen, John Gilmore, Olatunji, Coleman Hawkins, Harry Carney, John Coltrane.

    Check out this interview with Marshall and Danny at the Red Bull Music Academy!
    http://www.redbullmusicacademy.com/lectures/marshall-allen-danny-thompson-lecture

  • Strange City: Music of Claude Vivier
    8:00 PM
    02/09/2019

    3637 Chestnut St, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104

    3637 Chestnut St, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104

    The music of the Canadian composer Claude Vivier (1948-1983) combines diverse influences–from the the cerebral constructions of the European avant-garde to exoticist borrowings from East Asia– into a haunting and inimitable artistic voice. Vivier’s intense and colorful music mirrors his life as an eccentric and bon vivant who met a tragic death at the age of 34. The Arcana New Music Ensemble will present a selection of this rarely performed music, ranging from the shatteringly virtuosic piano work Shiraz to the ritualistic intonations of Et je reverrai cette ville étrange (“And I will see this strange city again”), which is based, like much of his music, on the unfolding elaboration of a single melodic line.

    PROGRAM
    Greeting Music
    Nicholas Handahl, flute
    Evan Ocheret, oboe
    Erin Busch, cello
    David Hughes, piano
    Andy Thierauf, percussion
    Hymnen An Die Nacht
    Alize Rosznyai, soprano
    David Hughes, piano
    Shiraz
    David Hughes, piano
    Pulau Dewata
    David Hughes, piano
    Andy Thierauf, percussion
    Et Je Reverrai Cette Ville Étrange
    Tessa Ellis, trumpet
    Emma Hey, viola
    Erin Busch, cello
    Davi Ciriaco, bass
    David Hughes, piano
    Andy Thierauf, percussion

    ABOUT THE PERFORMERS
    The Arcana New Music Ensemble is a Philadelphia based ensemble for performing interesting, beautiful, and unconventional music in interesting, beautiful, and unconventional spaces. Founded in 2016, the ensemble comprises a flexible roster of more than 30 musicians and performs regularly in Philadelphia. Past concerts have featured the music of Julius Eastman, Galina Ustvolskaya, Morton Feldman, Moondog, among others.
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  • Encounters at The Mothership Night 4
    8:00 PM-11:00 PM
    02/10/2019

    602 S. 52nd St, Philadelphia, PA 19143, USA

    602 S. 52nd St, Philadelphia, PA 19143, USA

    Tessa Ellis Solo
    +
    SEVERE ROTATION

    Heru Shabaka-Ra – Trumpet
    Watson – Bass Clarinet
    Dan Blacksberg – Trombone
    Rob Curto – Accordion
    Luke Stewart – Bass
    Nazir Ebo – Drums

    Music will start promptly at 8:15!
    Tickets are $15 at the door!
    The Mothership is located at 602 South 52nd St.

    Closing out the ENCOUNTERS @ Mothership series (for now…), Night Four will begin with a new piece of mine for solo trumpet performed by superstar trumpeter Tessa Ellis. The final performance of the series will feature Heru Shabaka-Ra (Sirius Juju, Heroes Are Gang Leaders and Watson (Sun Ra Arkestra, Sirius Juju), accordionist and composer Rob Curto, Luke Stewart on bass, Nazir Ebo on drums, and myself on trumpet. We will perform SEVERE ROTATION, a new composition for rhythm section and improvising soloists that looks towards minimalism and ritual musics.

    About Tessa Ellis:

    Tessa Ellis is a trumpeter and educator in Philadelphia, which she has called home since 2011 when she joined David Bilger’s studio at Temple University and subsequently the Curtis Institute of Music. She is a founding member of the Arcana New Music Ensemble, performing and curating concerts of new music, including 2019’s Arcana Brass concert. She brings her love of new music to her brass quintet, Opus 5, whose debut album will feature two works by living composers. Tessa has won first place in two divisions of the National Trumpet Competition, placed as a finalist in the Ellsworth-Smith International Trumpet Competition, and won second place at the International Trumpet Guild Orchestral Excerpts Competition. When she’s not playing trumpet, Tessa can be found teaching Children’s Music Playshop classes for Settlement Music School, where her students are infants and toddlers, and Exploratory Music for Play On Philly, where her students are five and six years old.

    About Luke Stewart:

    Luke has pursued a vast number of creative projects over the years. He plays bass and saxophone with DC-based indie rock band Laughing Man, who has performed at historic venues in the city including the Black Cat and St. Stephen’s Church, opening for national acts such as The Evens, Wavves, Junkyard Band, and Wale. He has also played saxophone with his own experimental group Ziggurat, as well as various special collaborative performances throughout the East Coast. His current projects include supergroup Irreversible Entanglements with Moor Mother, and Heroes Are Gang Leaders.

    As an electronic artist, he has been showcased in local exhibitions alongside legendary hip hop artist Grap Luva, and DC beatmaker Damu the Fudgemunk. He has also been a participant of Sonic Circuits’ Festival of Experimental Music, performing on the same bill as cellist Okkyung Lee, as well as performing in other venues alongside instrument builder Layne Garrett and saxophonist Sam Hillmer (Diamond Terrifier). He is also a member of experimental electronic trio Mind Over Matter, Music Over Mind, which has participated in numerous festival performances, including Sonic Circuits’ Festival and Noise Fest at George Mason University.

    On the jazz side, Luke has performed at many of DC’s historic venues including Bohemian Caverns, Twins Jazz, and HR-57. He had the honor of studying and performing with saxophonist Hamiett Bluiett. Recently he lead a 12-member ensemble in an hour-long tribute to John Coltrane on his birthday at the legendary Bohemian Caverns. He is also a member of Trio OOO, a collaborative ensemble featuring saxophonist Aaron Martin, and drummer Sam Lohman.

    More recently he has helped establish CapitalBop.com, a DC-based jazz website and 501c3 non-profit organization, as its Avant Music Editor. Through the site, he has helped launch a live jazz performance series dubbed the “DC Jazz Loft”, presenting some talented jazz artists in and around the DC area. He has also presented other jazz performances in his “Red Door Loft” series at the now-closed Goldleaf studios, as well as shows at CD Cellar in Arlington, VA, Bossa Bistro and Lounge, and DIY space the Paperhaus, where his performance curation was picked by Bob Boilen as one of the best shows of 2012.
    He is also an Artist-In-Residence at the art space Union Arts and Manufacturing, in Washington, DC, where he regularly rehearses his numerous musical projects as well as hosts special performances and workshops.

    During the day, he is the Production Coordinator for WPFW 89.3FM, as well as the host of THE VIBES edition of Overnight Jazz, weekly eclectic jazz program which showcases music from various sources in Luke’s musical explorations. Through WPFW he has had the privilege of working with some seminal figures in music and social justice such as Chuck Brown, Yusef Lateef, Randy Weston, Muhal Richard Abrams, Juma Sultan, and Amiri Baraka. He has had the opportunity of producing many successful programs including a month-long commemoration of Black Music Month., featuring notably the reunion of trombonist Phil Ranelin and saxophonist Wendell Harrison from the Tribe organization of Detroit. He also co-produced a month-long tribute to pianist Horace Tapscott Los Angeles based community organization UGMAA (Union of God’s Musicians and Artists Ascension). He also produced Washington, DC’s first live radio appearance of political prisoner Mumia Abu-Jamal on the program Jazz and Justice with Tom Porter.

    https://danblacksberg.com/

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  • Music in the Pavilion: Thomas Kraines & Friends
    7:00 PM
    02/15/2019

    3420 Walnut St Philadelphia, PA 19104, 6th floor

    3420 Walnut St Philadelphia, PA 19104, 6th floor

    The University of Pennsylvania’s Department of Music and the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts are proud to present our third jointly sponsored music series Music in the Pavilion. Taking place in the beautiful sixth-floor Class of 1978 Orrery Pavilion in Van Pelt Library, the series showcases an array of professional and international musicians, not only performing gems from standard concert repertoires but also premiering works found only in the wealth of materials—print and manuscript—held in the Kislak Center’s collections. Enriching the experience of each concert, attendees will have the opportunity to hear brief lectures by eminent scholars and graduate students that will contextualize the music historically, socially, and culturally.
    About the Program
    Cello Soundings: Thomas Kraines & Friends
    With Shani Aviram, live electronics: 
    Kaija Saariaho, Petals (1988)
    Gabriel Bolaños, Los Minúsculos (2018)
    With Mike Watson, bass clarinetist:
    Improvisations
    With Naoko Kikuchi, koto player:
    Amy Williams, Stop-Yield (2015)
    Gene Coleman, Kirigami II (2015)
    Yatsuhashi Kengyo, Rokudan no shirabe 
    Admission is free; REGISTER HERE
    About Thomas Kraines
    Cellist Thomas Kraines has forged a multifaceted career, equally comfortable with avant-garde improvisation, new music, and traditional chamber music and solo repertoire. Mr. Kraines is the cellist of the Daedalus Quartet, and has also been heard with ensembles such as Music from Copland House, The Transformational Music Ensemble, the East Coast Chamber Orchestra (ECCO), and the Network for New Music. An accomplished composer of chamber music, his works have been performed across the country by artists such as pianists Awadagin Pratt and Wayman Chin, violinists Corey Cerovsek and Jennifer Frautschi, and sopranos Maria Jette and Ilana Davidson. Mr. Kraines has taught at the Peabody Conservatory, the Longy School of Music, the Killington Music Festival, Yellow Barn, and Princeton University, and currently teaches at the University of Pennsylvania. He lives in Philadelphia with his wife, violinist Juliette Kang, and their two daughters, Rosalie and Clarissa.
    About Mike Watson
    Upon hearing the music of Eric Dolphy and his bass clarinet, Watson fell in love with the sound of that horn and it has been his primary means of expression ever since. As a student of Marshall Allen, he has been trained to use the spirit to create form and color with sound. Deeply influenced by the compositions and approach of Sun Ra and Thelonious Monk, he is in the midst of forming a musical collective, “The Great Blue Heron”. Watson is an active member of Philadelphia’s improvised music community, performing regularly for the past ten years. Watson plays in the Sun Ra Arkestra and has performed with other luminaries such as William Parker, Daniel Carter, Dave Burrell, Bobby Zankel, and King Britt.
    About Naoko Kikuchi
    Born in Sendai, Japan. In early childhood, she learned to play Koto from her mother and grandmother. Since 1990, she took lessons from Tadao Sawai and Kazue Sawai; Naoko received honor prizes from several contests subsequently. In 2007, Naoko received a year-long fellowship from the Japanese Government’s “Overseas Study Programme for Artists” to work in Frankfurt, Germany, where she currently is a member of IEMA (International Ensemble Modern Academie). Her repertoire is not only classic and contemporary koto music, she is also a versatile artist who participates in a variety of projects, such as in “the way in the international Berlin,” a project of the Berlin Philharmonic (2012); the new edition of “Barcelona” by Freddie Mercury & Montserrat Caballé (2012); music for silent films, “Page of Madness” by American composer Gene Coleman (2013); and the world premiere of a dance opera by composer Adriana Hölszky at the Deutsche Oper am Rhein (2014, 2017-18).
    About Shani Aviram
    Shani Aviram (b. Jerusalem, Israel) is a composer, sound designer and electronic musician currently based in Philadelphia. She works with fragments of memories, conversations and synthesized sounds, exploring forms of musical collage. Often, she will let the machine run wild. She has performed at The Megapolis Audio Festival, CubeFest at Virginia Tech, and Mills College amongst other institutions.
  • Greg Brown: Fall and Decline, Variant 6
    8:00 PM
    02/15/2019

    4014 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, United States

    4014 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, United States

    Bowerbird is pleased to present the world premiere of Greg Brown’s Fall and Decline performed by Variant 6. The new work composed for voices and electronics is based on texts of Sadakichi Hartmann, Eprenius, Todd Hearon, Edward Gibbon, and Omar Khayyam. The composition contemplates the inevitable decline of all things natural and manmade. Variant 6 pairs this new work with other pieces for voices and electronics, as well as selections of Medieval and Renaissance music.

    ABOUT THE PERFORMERS
    Variant 6 is a virtuosic vocal sextet that explores and advances the art of chamber music in the twenty-first century. The ensemble’s work includes radically reimagining concert experiences, commissioning substantial new works, collaborating closely with other ensembles, and educating a new generation of singers. Variant 6 has collaborated with a wide range of ensembles and composers, including Prometheus Chamber Orchestra, Arcana New Music Ensemble, Mobius Percussion Quartet, Square Peg Round Hole and Andrew Lipke, Jeremy Gill, Gregory W Brown, Kevin Laskey, and Wally Gunn. Devoted to educating a new generation of ensemble singers, Variant 6 has conducted residencies at Cornell University, Swarthmore College, and high schools in the Philadelphia area. Future projects include commissions by Joanne Metcalf and Kile Smith, and a collaboration with Piffaro, the Renaissance Band.
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  • Bill Frisell (performing solo)
    7:00 PM
    02/17/2019

    23 EAST LANCASTER AVENUE ARDMORE, PA 19003

    23 EAST LANCASTER AVENUE ARDMORE, PA 19003

    Bill Frisell’s career as a guitarist and composer has spanned more than 40 years and many celebrated recordings, whose catalog has been cited by Downbeat as “the best recorded output of the decade”.
    Released March of ’18, Frisell’s latest album for OKeh/Sony is a solo album titled, Music IS – “Taken as a whole the album beautifully encapsulates Frisell’s depth and range in all its meditative glory.” – Chicago Reader. It was recorded in August, 2017 at Tucker Martine’s Flora Recording and Playback studio in Portland, Oregon and produced by longtime collaborator Lee Townsend. All of the compositions on Music IS were written by Frisell, some of them brand new – Change in the Air, Thankful, What Do You Want, Miss You and Go Happy Lucky – others being solo adaptations of now classic original compositions he had previously recorded, such as Ron Carter, Pretty Stars, Monica Jane, and The Pioneers. In Line, and Rambler are from Frisell’s first two ECM albums.
    Frisell’s previous project, the Grammy nominated When You Wish Upon a Star also with OKeh/Sony, germinated at Lincoln Center during his two-year appointment as guest curator for the Roots of Americana series (September ’13 – May ’15). It features Frisell with vocalist Petra Haden, Eyvind Kang (viola), Thomas Morgan (bass) and Rudy Royston (drums) performing Frisell’s arrangements and interpretations of Music from Film and Television. Jazz Times described the project as follows: “unforgettable themes are the real draw here, reconfigured with ingenuity, wit and affection by Frisell and a terrific group.”
    “Frisell has had a lot of practice putting high concept into a humble package. Long hailed as one of the most distinctive and original improvising guitarists of our time, he has also earned a reputation for teasing out thematic connections with his music… There’s a reason that Jazz at Lincoln Center had him program a series called Roots of Americana.” – New York Times
    Recognized as one of America’s 21 most vital and productive performing artists, Frisell was named an inaugural Doris Duke Artist in 2012. He is also a recipient of grants from United States Artists, Meet the Composer among others. In 2016, he was a beneficiary of the first FreshGrass Composition commission to preserve and support innovative grassroots music. Upon San Francisco Jazz opening their doors in 2013, he served as one of their Resident Artistic Directors. Bill is also the subject of a new documentary film by director Emma Franz, entitled Bill Frisell: A Portrait, which examines his creative process in depth.
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  • CP Unit
    8:00 PM
    02/19/2019

    4014 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, United States

    4014 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, United States

    Chris Pitsiokos, alto saxophone and electronics
    Sam Lisabeth, electric guitar
    Henry Fraser, electric bass
    Jason Nazary, drums and electronics
    Please join us for a brain-rattling evening of extreme jazz with the Brooklyn-based Chris Pitsiokos Unit.
    The bracing music of saxophonist and composer Chris Pitsiokos combines the lyricism of jazz and the go-for-broke intensity of extreme rock forms and noise with the attention to detail and abstraction of contemporary classical music. His audacious quartet steamrolls over the borderlines between prog complexity, punk attitude, and jazz virtuosity with breakneck intensity.
    “Ecstatic, complex, punk-infused extreme-jazz… [Pitsiokos’ music features] traces of John Zorn’s full-scale eclecticism, Peter Brötzmann’s gale-force heft, the nihilistic noise of Lydia Lunch, and The Flying Luttenbachers’ ‘brutal prog.’ It’s no wonder the 20-something-year-old Pitsiokos has helped spearhead the nascent movement of fellow outliers shaping Brooklyn’s jazz underground.” -Bandcamp Daily
    Pitsiokos has been praised by Rolling Stone for his “startlingly original vision” and “astonishingly fleet sax work.” The saxophonist has worked with such forward-looking luminaries as Tyshawn Sorey, Peter Evans, Joe Morris, Philip White, Otomo Yoshihide, C Spencer Yeh, Nate Wooley, Brandon Seabrook, Lydia Lunch, Paul Lytton, Miya Masaoka, Mick Barr, Susana Santos Silva, and many more. He was a contributor to Arcana VIII, a book of essays edited by John Zorn, and was a resident at Zorn’s club the Stone in November 2016. In addition to performing and composing music, Pitsiokos was a longtime DJ at radio station WKCR-FM and has been producing concerts in Brooklyn and Manhattan for five years.
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  • Brandon Lopez Trio
    8:00 PM
    02/20/2019

    4014 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, United States

    4014 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, United States

    Steve Baczkowski, saxophone
    Brandon Lopez, bass
    Gerald Cleaver, drums
    Brandon Lopez is a bassist and composer working in the field of far-left musics, with a primary focus on improvisation. Since relocating to New York City not long ago, the Passaic, New Jersey native has become one of the most in-demand players of his generation, sharing the stage with such avant-garde visionaries as William Parker, Nate Wooley, Ingrid Laubrock, and the Sun Ra Arkestra. Lopez performs regularly with Amirtha Kidambi’s Elder Ones and the Weasel Walter Large Ensemble, along with groups led by Peter Evans, Tyshawn Sorey, and Joe Morris. He was the 2018 Artist-in-Residence at Issue Project Room and the Van Lier Fellow at Roulette Intermedium.
    Steve Baczkowski is an improviser, saxophonist, and multi-wind instrumentalist who has served as music director of Hallwalls Contemporary Arts Center in Buffalo, N.Y, since 1999, producing and presenting hundreds of concerts of contemporary music as well as numerous community-based artist residencies. In addition to organizing multiple ensembles, such as the Buffalo Improvisers Orchestra and the Buffalo Suicide Prevention Unit, Baczkowski also performs with the 12/8 Path Band, Genkin Philharmonic, Ubudis Quartet, Rey Scott’s Unusually Different, and in duos with percussionists Ravi Padmanabha and John Bacon and guitarists Bill Nace, Omar Tamez, and Bill Sack. Drummer Gerald Cleaver is a product of Detroit’s rich music tradition, gaining invaluable experience as a teenager playing with Detroit jazz masters Ali Muhammad Jackson, Lamont Hamilton, Earl Van Riper, and Pancho Hagood. Since moving to New York in 2002, he has performed or recorded with Henry Threadgill, Roscoe Mitchell, Reggie Workman, Marilyn Crispell, Matthew Shipp, William Parker, Craig Taborn, Charles Gayle, Mario Pavone, Ralph Alessi, Jimmy Scott, Muhal Richard Abrams, Dave Douglas, Tim Berne, Jeremy Pelt, Ellery Eskelin, David Torn and Miroslav Vitous, among others. Cleaver has released two recordings as a leader and leads the bands Violet Hour, NiMbNl and Uncle June.
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  • Bill Nace + Chris Corsano / Ken Brenninger / Jeff Zeigler
    8:00 PM-11:59 PM
    02/21/2019

    2341 N Front St Philadelphia, PA

    2341 N Front St Philadelphia, PA

    NACE / CORSANO
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uf-8sixfUp4

    KEN BRENNINGER
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=buTvgZSFpO8

    JEFF ZEIGLER
    http://www.uniformrecording.com

    Admission: $10
    Location: Jerry’s On Front, 2341 N Front St 19133, but enter blue door just around the corner on York St.

    Doors: 8:00pm
    Sounds: 8:45pm

    *WE ENCOURAGE EVERYONE TO BUY YOUR BEER AT WANG’S CUISINE JUST COUPLE DOORS DOWN AT 2333 N FRONT.

  • Jessica Pavone & Unseen Rain
    8:00 PM
    02/21/2019

    319 North 11th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19107

    319 North 11th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19107

    Jessica Pavone:
    Jessica Pavone (composer, viola, violin, el.bass) has performed in countless improvisation, avant jazz, experimental, folk, soul, and chamber ensembles since moving to NYC in 2000. She currently leads her own string ensemble, plays with the band JOBS, in a duo with guitarist Mary Halvorson, in Anthony Braxton’s Tri-Centric Orchestra and as a solo violist. As a composer, The Wire magazine praised her “ability to transform a naked tonal gesture into something special,” and The New York Times described her music as “distinct and beguiling…its core is steely, and its execution clear.”
    Pavone’s recent works for solo viola and voice stem from years of concentrated long tone practice and an interest in repetition, song form, and sympathetic vibration. She combines her long tone rituals with delay, understated melodies and sparse lyrical content while continuously experimenting with new forms. She is interested in the physicality of performing her somewhat larger-than-comfortable instrument and believes that cultivating physical bodies as a strong container for her thoughts is part of the creative process.
    Pavone has toured extensively throughout the U.S., Canada and Europe, performing in venues ranging from international music festivals, universities, and art galleries, to community centers and basements. Her music has premiered in venues in New York City such as, Roulette, Issue Project Room, and The Kitchen, and at the Klangbad Festival in Sheer, Germany. In 2011 she was featured in NPR’s “The Mix: 100 Composers Under 40.” She has received grants and commissions from the Aaron Copland Recording Fund, the American Music Center, New Music USA for her collaboration with choreographer, Anna Sperber, The Kitchen, MATA, The Jerome Foundation, The Tri-Centric Foundation, Experiments in Opera, and the chamber music collective, Till By Turning.
    Jessica is on a record release tour for her new album “In the Action” on Relative Pitch Records.
    Unseen Rain
    Unseen Rain is an acoustic ensemble comprised of strings, vibraphone and percussion. Recently founded by violinist June Bender, the group’s aesthetic draws from speech patterns, the poems of Rumi, and the music of John Luther Adams, Tin Hat Trio, and Paul Motion among others. Unseen Rain features Alban Bailly (Inzinzac, Oscuro Quintet, Yapp, Mazout), Matt Stein (Belleville Quartet, Illumina, Hoots and Hellmouth), Mike Szekely (Hawk Tubley & The Ozymandians, Reel, Dan Blacksberg Trio, The Scriptors, Several Wolves), Ashley Tini (Duomo) and June Bender (Belleville Quartet, Prometheus Chamber Orchestra).
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  • Joe Morris & Dawn Webster/Chad Brown Sesi döngüler duo
    8:00 PM
    02/22/2019

    1816 Frankford Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19125, United States

    1816 Frankford Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19125, United States

    Joe Morris:
    JOE MORRIS was born in New Haven, Connecticut on September 13, 1955. At the age of 12 he took lessons on the trumpet for one year. He started on guitar in 1969 at the age of 14. He played his first professional gig later that year. With the exception of a few lessons he is self-taught. The influence of Jimi Hendrix and other guitarists of that period led him to concentrate on learning to play the blues. Soon thereafter his sister gave him a copy of John Coltrane’s OM, which inspired him to learn about Jazz and New Music. From age 15 to 17 he attended The Unschool, a student-run alternative high school near the campus of Yale University in downtown New Haven. Taking advantage of the open learning style of the school he spent most of his time day and night playing music with other students, listening to ethnic folk, blues, jazz, and classical music on record at the public library and attending the various concerts and recitals on the Yale campus. He worked to establish his own voice on guitar in a free jazz context from the age of 17. Drawing on the influence of Coltrane, Miles Davis, Cecil Taylor,Thelonius Monk, Ornette Coleman as well as the AACM, BAG, and the many European improvisers of the ’70s. Later he would draw influence from traditional West African string music, Messian, Ives, Eric Dolphy, Jimmy Lyons, Steve McCall and Fred Hopkins. After high school he performed in rock bands, rehearsed in jazz bands and played totally improvised music with friends until 1975 when he moved to Boston.
    Between 1975 and 1978 he was active on the Boston creative music scene as a soloist as well as in various groups from duos to large ensembles. He composed music for his first trio in 1977. In 1980 he traveled to Europe where he performed in Belgium and Holland. When he returned to Boston he helped to organize the Boston Improvisers Group (BIG) with other musicians. Over the next few years through various configurations BIG produced two festivals and many concerts. In 1981 he formed his own record company, Riti, and recorded his first LpWraparound with a trio featuring Sebastian Steinberg on bass and Laurence Cook on drums. Riti records released four more LPs and CDs before 1991. Also in 1981 he began what would be a six year collaboration with the multi-instrumentalist Lowell Davidson, performing with him in a trio and a duo. During the next few years in Boston he performed in groups which featured among others; Billy Bang, Andrew Cyrille, Peter Kowald, Joe McPhee, Malcolm Goldstein, Samm Bennett, Lawrence “Butch” Morris and Thurman Barker. Between 1987 and 1989 he lived in New York City where he performed at the Shuttle Theater, Club Chandelier, Visiones, Inroads, Greenwich House, etc. as well as performing with his trio at the first festival Tea and Comprovisation held at the Knitting Factory.
    In 1989 he returned to Boston. Between 1989 and 1993 he performed and recorded with his electric trio Sweatshop and electric quartet Racket Club. In 1994 he became the first guitarist to lead his own session in the twenty year history of Black Saint/Soulnote Records with the trio recording Symbolic Gesture. Since 1994 he has recorded for the labels ECM, Hat Hut, Leo, Incus, Okka Disc, Homestead, About Time, Knitting Factory Works, No More Records, AUM Fidelity and OmniTone and Avant. He has toured throughout the U.S., Canada and Europe as a solo and as a leader of a trio and a quartet. Since 1993 he has recorded and/or performed with among others; Matthew Shipp, William Parker, Joe and Mat Maneri, Rob Brown, Raphe Malik, Ivo Pearlman, Borah Bergman, Andrea Parkins, Whit Dickey, Ken Vandermark, DKV Trio, Karen Borca, Eugene Chadborne, Susie Ibarra, Hession/Wilkinson/Fell, Roy Campbell Jr., John Butcher, Aaly Trio, Hamid Drake, Fully Celebrated Orchestra and others.
    He began playing acoustic bass in 2000 and has since performed with cellist Daniel Levin, Whit Dickey and recorded with pianist Steve Lantner.
    He has lectured and conducted workshops trroughout the US and Europe. He is a former member of the faculty of Tufts University Extension College and is currently on the faculty at New England Conservatory in the jazz and improvisation department. He was nominated as Best Guitarist of the year 1998 and 2002 at the New York Jazz Awards.
    Dawn Webster/Chad Brown Sesi döngüler duo:
    Talking the talk Walking the walks Hawking the halkmuzik Looping it transoceanic Mildly satanic Translating nations dance International trance Eagles zeybek-on-ing For an our-iggles-in-all interpretation Philly fresh conversation Of an electro-sonic Pan-demonic Septa-tonic Persuasion.
    THIS PROJECT WAS SUPPORTED BY A GRANT FROM PENN TREATY SPECIAL SERVICES DISTRICT
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  • Columbia Icefield
    8:00 PM
    02/24/2019

    1901 S. 9th Street Philadelphia, PA 19148

    1901 S. 9th Street Philadelphia, PA 19148

    Nate Wooley, trumpet + amplifier
    Mary Halvorson, guitar
    Susan Alcorn, pedal steel
    Ryan Sawyer, drums + vocals
    Please join us for the Philadelphia debut of trumpeter Nate Wooley’s new quartet Columbia Icefield, featuring Mary Halvorson, Susan Alcorn, and Ryan Sawyer.
    Nate Wooley grew up in Oregon near the mouth of the mighty Columbia River, which flows more than 1,200 from the Canadian Rockies through Washington and into the Pacific; the eclectic trumpeter saw the Columbia empty into the ocean nearly every day of his youth. Now, in the auspicious new quartet Columbia Icefield, he traces it back northeast to the massive geographic feature of the same name, the place where snowmelt and glacial collapse gives rise to the river. The quartet’s evocative songs—which move from confident rhythmic strut to near-pastoral drone, from drifting reverie to ghostly dissonance—convey a fitting sense of topography, of watching a landscape rise in plain sight.
    A new group as well as a new direction in Wooley’s musical aesthetic, Columbia Icefield is an electric quartet featuring the leader on trumpet and amplifier, Mary Halvorson on electric guitar, Susan Alcorn on pedal steel guitar, and Ryan Sawyer on drums and vocals. A departure from Wooley’s usual electro-acoustic work with its leanings toward harsh noise, Columbia Icefield is the first recording of compositions inspired by the geographic site which gives the band its name. The music, while still dealing in the intensity and humanity of Wooley’s projects like Seven Storey Mountain and The Almond, are serene and stoic; a beautiful set of “songs” that are, as the composer admits, “the closest I’ve ever come to expressing the central tenet of who I am and where I’m from.”
    Wooley’s collaborators in Columbia Icefield are among the most adventurous musicians in modern jazz and creative music. Drummer and vocalist Ryan Sawyer is one of his generation’s greats, his rhythmic and textual restlessness creating expansive canvases for sound. Steel guitarist Susan Alcorn knows about those: Expressive and ponderous, her work exists in a kind of ever-present emotional flux, asking that you fill in its open spaces with impressions and experiences of your own. Guitarist Mary Halvorson—like Wooley, one of the defining voices of what “jazz” can be in the modern era—adds her singular tone and idiosyncratic sense of harmony and dissonance to these beautiful and balanced songs, which illuminate a disappearing landscape with curiosity and imagination.
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